1021girl:
snickerdoodlesandsausages:

enjolrasactual:

in-love-with-my-bed:

the-winchesters-creed:

ayellowstateofmind:

imagine stabbing someone with this knife.

it would instantly cauterize the would, so the person wouldn’t bleed, so it’s not very useful.

if you want information it is

and above, in order, we see a gryffindor, a ravenclaw, and a slytherin

why would you stab a PERSON when you can have TOAST?

there’s the hufflepuff

1021girl:

snickerdoodlesandsausages:

enjolrasactual:

in-love-with-my-bed:

the-winchesters-creed:

ayellowstateofmind:

imagine stabbing someone with this knife.

it would instantly cauterize the would, so the person wouldn’t bleed, so it’s not very useful.

if you want information it is

and above, in order, we see a gryffindor, a ravenclaw, and a slytherin

why would you stab a PERSON when you can have TOAST?

there’s the hufflepuff

(Source: picapixels)

I like how…. —me when I don’t like how (via oikawabooru)

(Source: hellomolls)


73,015 notes   » Reblogged from truthofnostalgia
[A very fluffy golden retriever puppy looking extraordinarily dignified sitting on a large rock.]
dynastylnoire:


awwww-cute:

Puppy’s First Hike

I climbed this rock
This my rock
[A very fluffy golden retriever puppy looking extraordinarily dignified sitting on a large rock.]

dynastylnoire:

awwww-cute:

Puppy’s First Hike

I climbed this rock

This my rock

lesbianvenom:

college is a truly amazing place

lesbianvenom:

college is a truly amazing place


30,577 notes   » Reblogged from englishistheartofbullshit

morivan:

My dream for the 2016 presidential election is not having to choose which human rights I’m feeling like compromising on.

(Source: griffmorivan)


44,315 notes   » Reblogged from truthofnostalgia
TERF: What It Means and Where It Came From | The Trans Advocate

america-wakiewakie:

Trans Exclusionary Radical Feminists (TERF) are quick to make fact assertions about the term, TERF. According to TERFs, the term is a slur and use of the term makes one a misogynist. 
…[But] within feminist and trans discourse, the term refers to a very specific type of person who wraps anti-trans bigotry in the language of feminism. A hallmark of TERF discourse is that it tends to sound a lot like the anti-trans rhetoric coming out of extreme right-wing groups.
…[T]he following interview I did with one of the cisgender feminists who are responsible for popularizing TERF as a feminist concept.
Defining TERF: Interviewing the Feminist Who Popularized It

Cristan Williams: From what I can see, yours is the earliest use. The term has become fairly common in trans discourse.

TigTog: Lauredhel and I are pretty sure that we started using trans-exclusionary radfem (TERF) activists as a descriptive term in our own chats a while before I used it in that post.

C: TERFs have made some assertions about your lexical contribution to feminist discourse. For instance: “TERF is not meant to be explanatory, but insulting. These characterizations are hyperbolic, misleading, and ultimately defamatory.”

T: It was not meant to be insulting. It was meant to be a deliberately technically neutral description of an activist grouping. I notice that since TERF has gone out into the wild, many people seem to usetrans-exclusive rather than  trans-exclusionary or  trans-excluding, and I think that leads to some exploitable ambiguity. It is possible to interpret trans-exclusive as “exclusively talks about trans* issues” (which could quite rightly be considered a slam on the rest of their feminism), while trans-exclusionary is more specific that their exclusion of trans* voices and bodies from being considered women/feminists is the point.

C: I find it interesting that this term originates in the feminist community and was popularized by a cisgender woman. I think the assumption has been that a trans person had coined the term in the last year or so. Was there a specific incident – or a culmination of incidents – that lead you to advocate for the use of this term?

T: We wanted a way to distinguish TERFs from other radfems with whom we engaged who were trans*-positive/neutral, because we had several years of history of engaging productively/substantively with non-TERF radfems, and then suddenly TERF comments/posts seemed to be erupting in RadFem spaces where they threadjacked dozens of discussions, and there was a great deal of general frustration about that. It is possible that one of us picked it or something similar up from an IRC discussion elsewhere and then we both adopted/adapted it for ourselves, perhaps transforming it from some other initialism into an acronym, because we both appreciate the utility of acronyms in simplifying discourse.

C: You seemed to take personal offense over the colonization of the RadFem identity by an anti-trans group. Was this because you identified as a RadFem and/or have friends that were RadFem who were frustrated by a colonization of their feminist identity – that RadFem became synonymous with being anti-trans?

T: Not so much personally offended as pointedly pedantic, although I certainly sympathised with various RadFems I knew who felt that mAndrea and her fellows did not speak for them and were disrupting other discussions with anti-trans* derails. I was still quite actively writing FAQs for the Finally, A Feminism 101 Blog then, so being pedantic about what various strands of feminism were and were not saying was pretty much second nature at the time.

C: Some TERFs have asserted that others do not have a right to make a distinction between TE RadFems (TERFs) and RadFems.

T: The idea that any group can deny others the right to make distinctions between opinions/positions voiced by different members in that group seems utterly absurd. Obviously, nobody can force anybody who voices what others consider TERF stances to self-adopt the TERF label for themselves, but they can always choose another name for their stance which is not held by all other RadFems. After all, RadFem itself is a label chosen by some feminists to distinguish themselves from other feminists, and those feminists felt insulted that what they were doing was not considered sufficiently radical to fall under the RadFem label, see also the womanist/feminist distinction – distinguishing between different arms of activism is what social activist movements do as they grow and develop and react to change within and without.

C: Others assert that the TERF is a slur. How would you respond to such assertions?

T: It was not originally intended as such. Initially the TERF acronym didn’t seem to gain much traction at all, so I never really kept track. Since it’s become in more common usage, no doubt there are some people that use it as a slur. The same thing happened to “radical feminist” and also to “feminist” – any group-identifying word can and will be used as a slur by those who find that group challenging, but that doesn’t mean that the word is fundamentally/always/only a slur.

C: How do you feel about the impact you’ve had in feminist discourse (re: your lexical contribution)?

T: I don’t really know. The acronym was something Lauredhel and I found useful for some of the discussions we were having at the time (and as mentioned above, we aren’t really sure that we invented it as such anyway rather than adopted/adapted it). We thought it might be useful for some others having similar discussions, so we and our co-bloggers shared it around in some of those discussions. That it did eventually catch on and people still find it useful after five years, and that it’s now a label that TERFs feel the need to push back on? It’s certainly intriguing, but I don’t really feel any strong sense of ownership over the term (language is a collective construct which evolves with variant usages, after all). I wanted to communicate something clearly at the time, and it worked for that. That it’s still working for people engaging in that ongoing trans*-inclusion/exclusion debate is certainly satisfying on several levels, definitely.

(Read Full Text)

I’ve heard that TERF stood for trans exterminatory radical feminists. And to not hear that decoding really drives it home.


34 notes   » Reblogged from tgstonebutch
somepretty-things:

boo-author:

fluffmugger:

beckyblackbooks:

Yawns are catching. Even when you’re kittens in a bucket.

OH GOD THERE ARE THREE OF THEM

The mythical kittydra!

somepretty-things:

boo-author:

fluffmugger:

beckyblackbooks:

Yawns are catching. Even when you’re kittens in a bucket.

OH GOD THERE ARE THREE OF THEM

The mythical kittydra!

(Source: catleecious)

After she came up to me and said, “I’ve been with my partner for 20 years… We would never get married because he’s on social security income, and because my daughter is disabled I have secondary income from the state to support my daughter. If I got married, both my benefits and his benefits would be reduced because we would become a double income family.”

She was explaining that marriage doesn’t work for poor people, and that it doesn’t work for disabled people. Having really simple examples like hers are important.

What if the LGBTQ movement fought for prison abolition rather than same-sex marriage? (via disabilityhistory)

sexxxisbeautiful:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters gather before the march this afternoon in St. Louis.

Saturday, October 11th.

Black Lives Matter


1,593 notes   » Reblogged from sexxxisbeautiful

echoboots:

blackandpinkfamily:

bifishromance:

LA County is considering making homelessness a parole violation and if that isn’t the most fucked up clear proof that the prison system is about getting poor, “unsavory” people out of sight out of mind then I don’t know what is.

I just started angry crying. [EVAP]

So… as far as I can tell it’s already difficult to the point of impossibility to get/stay out on parole while homeless, just so you know. You have to have an articulated address and a place to go in order to qualify for parole in the first place, and leaving that address/going incommunicado can be grounds for revoked parole. This law would formalize an already-existing effect. :(

Yeah, I know, you have to have an address to be released to, and that changes in address have to be reported to your PO, but while the effect of those conditions might make homelessness a parole violation, actually articulating that not having a home is a parole violation makes me feel hopeless.


6,919 notes   » Reblogged from echoboots

blackandpinkfamily:

bifishromance:

LA County is considering making homelessness a parole violation and if that isn’t the most fucked up clear proof that the prison system is about getting poor, “unsavory” people out of sight out of mind then I don’t know what is.

I just started angry crying. [EVAP]

bisexualpiratequeen:

I’m trying hard to live by Cat Principles.

1. I am glorious above all things
2. Eat when hungry, sleep when sleepy, play when bored
3. Affection is given and received on my terms and only mine
4. Show displeasure clearly.
5. NO
6. Demand the things you want. If they aren’t given, demand them again, but louder this time.
7. If you are touched when you don’t want to be, say so. If they continue to touch you, make them bleed.


156,705 notes   » Reblogged from pondsinplaid

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Protesters occupy St. Louis University.

Early morning, Monday, October 13th


49,466 notes   » Reblogged from blackfemalescientist
White feminists:

blackfemalescientist:

quietbang:

split-the-coast:

When you discuss the wage gap, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Only white women make $0.77 to a man’s dollar.
  • Black women make about $0.68 to a man’s dollar.
  • Latina women make about $0.58 to a man’s dollar.

Intersectionality matters.

I will keep reblogging this to point out that disabled people, including men, make 22 cents on the dollar. Mostly because it is legal to pay us below minimum wage, but whatevs.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Allow me to copy and paste myself

I just became a client of a social services agency in my little pamphlet of my rights, it says: You may perform work in agreement with a planned and supervised program of vocational, rehabilitational, or habilitational training as set forth in your goals and objectives. Such work will be paid to the extent of its economic value. (Work programs that are certified to pay less than the federal minimum wage will pay a wage that is commensurate with the worker’s individual productivity in proportion to the wage and productivity of experienced workers who do not have disabilities performing essentially the same type, quality, and quantity of work in the geographic area. There are layyyers of bullshit here.
  • First I’d like to point out that a disabled person’s work can literally be assigned less value for an hour of labor than a minimum wage person taking a while shit on the clock.
  • The people to whom disabled workers are being compared in assessing wages are not merely non-disabled people. They are non-disabled people producing the same type, quality, and quantity of work as the disabled person. In other words, the exact same labor and production can be assigned a literally criminally lower value simply because it is performed by a disabled person
  • Like, think about that. That means that within a capitalist system people are not only being assigned worth based on the type/quality/quantity of work performed, but on their identities. I have seen some arguments suggesting that a disabled person who produces half as much work as a non-disabled person performing the same job could fairly be paid half as much.
  • That is NOT what is happening
  • Disabled people are being paid less for the same job because they are disabled.
  • THE SECTION THAT I TOOK THIS QUOTE FROM HAS A BOLDED HEADER WHICH SAYS “[YOU HAVE] THE RIGHT TO BE PROTECTED FROM BEING MANIPULATED OR TAKEN ADVANTAGE OF IN BUSINESS MATTERS.”
Tags: # disability
223,227 notes   » Reblogged from blackfemalescientist
You know how excited you get to get some mail that’s not a bill?

blackandpinkfamily:

blackandpinkfamily:

Now imagine it’s the only human contact you’re getting, outside of what you can shout through vents and food slots.

Our members tell us that getting mail is a treasure and something that keeps them going. Because (in gen pop) mail is  called out loud, it can also be a harm reduction technique: when an inmate’s name is called, the COs and other prisoners know that person has community and that someone will know if they are hurt. 

The first step to getting mail to prisoners is mail processing! Come open letters from people in lock-up, learn about what they are going through, connect them to resources, and get them in our pen pal database so they can find a friend!

Every Sunday, we meet from 1-4p at Make Shift, 549 Columbus Ave, South End to process mail and we’d love you to come! Keep an eye on our Facebook for more info each week. Please bring a laptop, if possible.

The next few Sundays are a GREAT time to come to mail processing. We are trying to get as many people put into the system as possible as we reach out with the largest ever survey of incarcerated LGBTQ+ people. You can read the questions we’re asking here

Tags: # Boston
5 notes   » Reblogged from blackandpinkfamily
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